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Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic

The vast reservoir of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost is gradually being converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) after entering the freshwater system in a process thought to be controlled largely by microbial ...

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Google to help boost Greece's tourism industry

Internet giant Google will offer management courses to 3,000 tourism businesses on the island of Crete as part of an initiative to promote the sector in Greece, industry union Sete said on Thursday.

NKorea launch pad expansion 'nearing completion'

A U.S. research institute says construction to upgrade North Korea's main rocket launch pad should be completed by fall, allowing Pyongyang (pyuhng-yahng) to conduct a launch by year's end if it decides to do so.

Water crisis threatens thirsty Sao Paulo

Sao Paulo is thirsty. A severe drought is hitting Brazil's largest city and thriving economic capital with no end in sight, threatening the municipal water supply to millions of people.

Canada to push Arctic claim in Europe

Canada's top diplomat will discuss the Arctic with his Scandinavian counterparts in Denmark and Norway next week, it was announced Thursday, a trip that will raise suspicions in Russia.

American Ebola doc: 'I am thrilled to be alive'

Microsoft to unveil new Windows software

A news report out Thursday indicated that Microsoft is poised to give the world a glimpse at a new-generation computer operating system that will succeed Windows 8.

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Golden cheese with that dark toasted-cheese color scattered in distinct blistery patches across the surface with a bit of oil glistening in the valleys. ...

Toothpaste fluorine formed in stars

The fluorine that is found in products such as toothpaste was likely formed billions of years ago in now dead stars of the same type as our sun. This has been shown by astronomers at Lund University in Sweden, ...

New test helps diagnose type 1 diabetes

New US restrictions on painkiller to take effect

New DNA test for diagnosing diseases linked to childhood blindness

Asthma outcomes worse in older women

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Enabling a new future for cloud computing

The National Science Foundation (NSF) today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds—to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab"—that will enable the academic research community ...

Electric sparks may alter evolution of lunar soil

The moon appears to be a tranquil place, but modeling done by University of New Hampshire and NASA scientists suggests that, over the eons, periodic storms of solar energetic particles may have significantly ...

The ethics of driverless cars

Jason Millar, a PhD Candidate in the Department of Philosophy, spends a lot of time thinking about driverless cars. Though you aren't likely to be able to buy them for 10 years, he says there are a number ...

Of bees, mites, and viruses

Honeybee colonies are dying at alarming rates worldwide. A variety of factors have been proposed to explain their decline, but the exact cause—and how bees can be saved—remains unclear. An article published on August ...

Researchers create engineered energy absorbing material

(Phys.org) —Materials like solid gels and porous foams are used for padding and cushioning, but each has its own advantages and limitations. Gels are effective as padding but are relatively heavy; gel performance ...

The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

LMU researchers have developed a new process which will greatly simplify the process of sorting plastics in recycling plants. The method enables automated identification of polymers, facilitating rapid separation ...

An approach to fighting the Ebola virus

Reading 'Fifty Shades' linked to unhealthy behaviors

A novel pathway for prevention of heart attack and stroke

Learning to play the piano? Sleep on it!

Emergency department nurses aren't like the rest of us

Breast cancer imaging surgery world-first

How 'wriggling' skin cancer cells go on the move

Many patients don't understand electronic lab results

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