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Atomic-scale ping-pong

New experiments by researchers at the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester have shed more light on the gas flow through tiny, angstrom-sized channels with atomically flat walls.

date9 hours ago in Nanophysics
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Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees

An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.

date8 hours ago in Ecology
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Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colors

As a chameleon shifts its color from turquoise to pink to orange to green, nature's design principles are at play. Complex nano-mechanics are quietly and effortlessly working to camouflage the lizard's skin to match its environment.

date7 hours ago in Nanophysics
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New tool using Facebook data shows worldwide gender gap

An international group of researchers, involving scientists from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna & Medical University of Vienna and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, developed a tool to track and analyse gender inequality ...

Charting a path to better cell models of the intestine

For many years, drug development has relied on simplified and scalable cell culture models to find and test new drugs for a wide variety of diseases. However, cells grown in a dish are often a feint representation of healthy ...

Cooler computing through statistical physics?

In the space inside a computer chip, where electricity becomes information, there's a scientific frontier. The same frontier can be found inside a cell, where information instead takes the form of chemical concentrations. ...

Birds have time-honored traditions, too

What makes human cultural traditions unique? One common answer is that we are better copycats than other species, which allows us to pass our habits and ways of life down through the generations without losing or forgetting ...

Mind wandering is fine in some situations, study says

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China and the US are racing to develop AI weapons

When Google's AlphaGo defeated the Chinese grandmaster at a game of Go in 2017, China was confronted with its own "Sputnik moment": a prompt to up its game on the development of artifical intelligence (AI). Sure enough, Beijing ...

Robot bloodhound tracks odors on the ground

Bloodhounds are famous for their ability to track scents over great distances. Now researchers have developed a modern-day bloodhound—a robot that can rapidly detect odors from sources on the ground, such as footprints. ...

Dogs understand what's written all over your face

Dogs are capable of understanding the emotions behind an expression on a human face. For example, if a dog turns its head to the left, it could be picking up that someone is angry, fearful or happy. If there is a look of ...

Crumple up this keyboard and stick it in your pocket

Bendable portable keyboards for use with computers and other electronic devices are already on the market, but they have limited flexibility, and they're fairly sizable when rolled up for transport. Now researchers have crafted ...

Augmented reality helps build aircraft tanks

Walking through an unfamiliar city, getting directions or simulations of buildings that no longer exist – augmented reality is where virtual content and the real world come together. Scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of ...

Teaching robots to sort out their issues

Robots can help do a lot of things—assemble cars, search for explosives, cook a meal or aid in surgery. But one thing they can't do is tell you how they're doing—yet.

Researchers use AI to improve mammogram interpretation
Sociodemographic factors impact heart-healthy behaviors
Enlist a pharmacist to help manage high blood pressure
HbA1c targets should be personalized in type 2 diabetes
Daily cannabis use is on the rise in American adults

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